Latest Event Updates

University of Waterloo Grade 10 Family Night

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The University of Waterloo will be hosting an evening for Grade 10 students and their parenwaterloots on Thursday, February 23 from 6:30 – 8:30 PM. This is a great opportunity for grade 10 students who are thinking about attending any of Ontario’s universities. Information covered will include finding a program that is a good fit, navigating the application process, and financing post-secondary education.

https://uwaterloo.ca/find-out-more/grade-10-family-night

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Age of Distraction: Why It’s Crucial for Students to Learn to Focus

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Digital classroom tools like computers, tablets and smartphones offer exciting opportunities to deepen learning through creativity, collaboration and connection, but those very devices can also be distracting to students. Similarly, parents complain that when students are required to completedistractions homework assignments online, it’s a challenge for students to remain on task. The ubiquity of digital technology in all realms of life isn’t going away, but if students don’t learn how to concentrate and shut out distractions, research shows they’ll have a much harder time succeeding in almost every area.

“It’s about using the devices smartly but having the capacity to concentrate as you need to, when you want to.”

Full article:

https://ww2.kqed.org/mindshift/2013/12/05/age-of-distraction-why-its-crucial-for-students-to-learn-to-focus/

STUDY SMART

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exam-prep-pictureDon’t leave it until the last minute. While some students do seem to thrive on last-minute ‘cramming’, it is widely accepted that for most of us, this is not the best way to approach an exam. Set out a timetable for your study. Write down how many exams you have and the days on which you have to sit them. Then organize your study accordingly. You may want to give some exams more study time than others, so find a balance that you feel comfortable with:

Study Checklist

  • Have you identified the exam specifics (format of questions, time allowed, content to be tested)
  • Have you organized your textbook notes and lecture notes (sequenced, stapled, in piles or folders)
  • Have you integrated / cross-referenced your textbook notes with your class notes
  • Have you tried to draw diagrams or mind maps to explain difficult concepts
  • Have you determined if there is content that you need more help understanding
  • Have you tried to explain the content from your notes in your own words and out loud if possible
  • Have you practised solving the problem-type questions
  • Have you found sample questions (from other textbooks or websites) that could be asked on the exam
  • Have you tried making flash cards or using mnemonics, acronyms, analogies, etc. to recall content
  • Have you tried to teach someone else the material that you are studying
  • Have you constructed a practice exam for the content that will be studied
  • Have you determined when is your best time of day to study
  • Have you determined a good location for successful studying
  • Have you tried to review your textbook and lecture notes regularly

http://www.learningcommons.uoguelph.ca/guides/university_learning/accessibility/studying.html

https://uwaterloo.ca/student-success/resources/online-resources

http://pub.lucidpress.com/4030e19f-92e6-4ce7-81bd-213a3ce95ed7/

FIVE MYTHS ABOUT GENIUS

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It’s not always easy to know when we’re in the presence of “genius.” In part, that’s because we barely agree on what it means. In Roman times, genius was not something you achieved but rather an animating spirit that adhered itself to people and places. In the 18th century, Romantics gave genius its modern meaning: Someone with special, almost divine abilities. Today, we’re quick to anoint a “marketing genius” or a “political genius,” oblivious to the fact that true genius requires no such modification. In truth, real geniuses transcend the confines of their particular domains. They inspire and awe. Which is precisely why we should use the word sparingly, lest it lose some of its magic. That’s not the only misconception.

Read the rest of Eric Weiner’s article: https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/five-myths-about-genius/2016/10/21/ffecc73c-96e0-11e6-9b7c-57290af48a49_story.html?utm_term=.5369ada4f0b1

albert-einstein

 

Knowledge Integration seminar series

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INTEG 10 is a seminar on transdisciplinary topics and integrative practices which are of special interest to Knowledge Integration students.  This is the “living room” of the program; a place where ideas come together.

We welcome friends and visitors!

professor in discussion with students after seminar

Each session features a different guest speaker and is open to all students, faculty, staff, alumni and members of the public.  We encourage sparkling and lively discussion between speakers and audience members.

https://uwaterloo.ca/knowledge-integration/events/knowledge-integration-seminar-series

SHAD: The 2017 SHAD program will run from July 2 – 28

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shad-students

The SHAD experience is a lifelong experience and begins with our month-long summer program, which will show you what you can achieve if you think big and pursue your extraordinary potential.

Each year, top-performing Grades 10, 11 and 12 students or the international equivalent, compete for a place in the month-long program, which is focused on STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts & math) disciplines. Approximately 700 students are accepted annually to participate and live in-residence on one of our host university campuses across Canada during the July program.

SHAD provides the unique opportunity to explore a university campus while still in high school, and experience higher learning in a supportive yet challenging environment. Included are lectures, seminars and workshops, presentations by industry leaders, working in teams to simulate a ‘startup’ project, and recreational activities.

http://www.shad.ca/Students.htm

MP Bryan May looks to get some youthful input

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youth-council

CAMBRIDGE- Cambridge MP Bryan May is putting out a call for teens interested in helping set the agenda for the country and their future.

May recently announced the formation of a Cambridge and North Dumfries MP’s Youth Council, which will serve as a youth liaison for the representative in Ottawa, providing input on federal government policies, ideas and initiatives.

 “I’ve worked with young people my entire career, from the YMCA to the Boys and Girls Club, and I know that they have good ideas,” May said in a news release.

“The issues we’re going to look at are critical to get youth input on, and I’m pleased to be bringing those ideas back to Ottawa. I know how engaged youth are on so many issues and I’m excited to start this collaboration.”

The youth council will consist of about 20 youths between the ages of 15 and 19.

Feedback from the council will be consolidated and presented to federal ministers throughout the year to help influence government policy.

Officials at May’s office will be accepting applications until Sept. 30. Anyone interested in taking part can learn more and apply online:  http://bryanmaymp.ca/page/youth